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PUBLIC CEREMONIES IN 1984 AND WE George Orwell in 1984 and Yevgeny Zamyatin in We show that totalitarian governments gain strength by making their citizens feel as though they are part of a greater whole. This is demonstrated by the governments repeated use of public ceremonies culminating in huge, propaganda-filled spectacles that increase loyalty towards the government and create a sense of unity amongst the people. Both novels also use public executions to show the scare tactics used b

The Handmaid's Tale In a passage from pages 84-85 in Margaret Atwood's novel, The Handmaid's Tale, diction, imagery, syntax, rhetorical shifts and other literary devices were used to depict the character's attitude. Offred's attitude towards her life was one of sorrow and depression. Offred had begun to take her bath, something that she seldom got to go. During this time, she had a flashback about her daughter and was wondering what had happened to her. Offred was filled

The Sixth Sense Adam Fisher Professor Blackwell 11 October 2001 The problem with most horror films these days is that they seem to feel that disgust and fear are interchangeable; that waving a few severed limbs or some intestines at an audience will have the same effect as engaging that audience's imagination and playing on its deepest fears. Just how wrong this attitude is has been fully demonstrated over the past few months by the runaway success of M. Night Shyamalan's The Sixth Sense.

During an unnamed time of war, a plane carrying a group of British schoolboys is shot down over the Pacific. The pilot of the plane is killed, but many of the boys survive the crash and find themselves deserted on an uninhabited island, where they are alone without adult supervision. The novel begins with the aftermath of the crash, once the boys have reached the island. The first two boys introduced are the main protagonists of the story: Ralph is among the oldest of the boys, handsome and conf

If gaining success were easy, everybody would be successful. Although who is to say what exactly being successful embodies. In America, the success of a person is weighed according to the amount of materialistic possessions one has attained. In a success orientated society such as this, living according to these values means that one must also be aware of failure. In the play "Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller, the author touches upon the themes of failure and staying true to one's sel

Patriarchy, Conformity and Individuality as Expressed in The Bell Jar and Edible Woman There has always been some amount of difficulty being a woman in our society, whether it be in the present day or fifty years ago. There are many roles that women are expected to play and many circumstances they have to face if they "fail" to live out these certain roles. Our world is filled with conformity, patriarchy and stereotypical attitudes that are so embedded into us that it

Fear, confusion and intimidation are not just feelings. If they are used in the right way they can be used for control and power. A dictator in a totalitarian regime will use these emotions to control his people. The world that Winston Smith lives in has no personal rights, poor living conditions, and everything is controlled by hatred, even the people's history and language. The language Newspeak is being implemented by the government to limit the possibility of political rebellion by el

Fear, confusion and intimidation are not just feelings. If they are used in the right way they can be used for control and power. A dictator in a totalitarian regime will use these emotions to control his people. The world that Winston Smith lives in has no personal rights, poor living conditions, and everything is controlled by hatred, even the people's history and language. The language Newspeak is being implemented by the government to limit the possibility of political rebellion by el

The Jukebox Queen of Malta describes Rocco Raven's experiences during his eight months at Malta. One day, while walking through the mangled streets of the tiny Mediterranean island, Rocco notices a beautiful woman glancing back at him. He follows her into a house on Windmill Street. When the two finally come face to face in a barren room at the top of a staircase, they fall onto a mattress in a fervid embrace. After acting upon their passions, the woman leaves without even revealing her name

Throughout this novel, we see Alison adjust from a child to a young and confident woman. What events bring about this change? Introduction There are many important phases in life, ranging from baby, to toddler, to schoolchild to high school and finally to an adult. Many regard puberty as the most important phase as it involves growing from a dependant child to a self-sufficient adult. Growing up (maturing) is different in every individual. In the novel ‘