World History

130 total

The American Revolution was an inevitable war that occurred between the American and British forces. Although it was found that both groups were at fault, opinions upon the matter of who was more at fault are divided. The following attempts to depict the situation from an American's point of view. First and foremost, the issue of Britain's abuse of power must be addressed. Over the duration of ten years, the British passed over twelve laws, all of which threatened the three natural ri

The causes of the French Revolution, being provoked by this collision of the powers of the rising bourgeoise and an sinking aristocracy defending its privileges, was the Financial debt of the government and the long-standing political differences in the government. Over the course of twenty-five years after the Seven Years' War, the government of France could not manage it's finances on a sound basis. This was worsened when France aided the American Revolution against Great Britain. The Govern

TAXATION: DO CANADIAN CORPORATIONS PAY THEIR SHARE? When looking at large corporations on the Canadian soil, one might wonder what keeps them there. To fully understand such a question, you must study the business, but most of all its taxation and regulation. Big corporations in Canada don't pay their full share when it comes to taxes. The central government helps out big businesses in order to keep the money circulating through Canada instead off other countries. It is seen as inappropriate

The American Revolution was largely economic and political in nature. The political reasons were that England neglected the colonies, taxation without representation and limitation of individual rights and privacy. Then there was the most important side the economic. There was trade restriction, mercantilism, and taxation. On the economic side of the revolution colonist acknowledged that natural laws should govern their economy. But only the southern colonies were bound to England i

Causes of the French Revolution- The statement citing the essential cause of the French Revolution as the "collision between a powerful, rising bourgeoisie and an entrenched aristocracy defending it's privileges" has great pertinence in summarizing the conflict of 1789. The causes of the French Revolution, being provoked by this collision of powers, was the Financial debt of the government and the long-standing political differences in the government. Over the course of twenty-fiv

The French Revolution The statement citing the essential cause of the French Revolution as the "collision between a powerful, rising bourgeoisie and an entrenched aristocracy defending it's privileges" has great pertinence in summarizing the conflict of 1789. The causes of the French Revolution, being provoked by this collision of powers, was the Financial debt of the government and the long-standing political differences in the government. Over the course of twenty-five years

Transcending the Barriers "My primary interest is to explain something out there that impinges me, and I would sell my soul to the devil if I thought it would help." Eric Wolf, 1987 Eric Wolf's interest into the realm of anthropology emerged upon recognition of the theorist- imposed boundaries, encompassing both theories and subjects, which current and past anthropological scholars had constructed. These boundaries, Wolf believed, were a result of theorist tending to societies and cul

The outcome of the Julius and Ethel Rosenberg Trial for espionage in 1951 and their subsequent execution in 1953 was directly related to the political climate at that time. The governments evidence against the Rosenbergs was not over whelming but due to a combination of fear and political pressure the guilty verdict was inevitable. Even though Julius did not deliver the secrets of the bomb to Moscow and nor did they cause the Korean war, as Judge Kaufman claimed, they were sentenced t

The cause of World War I can be significantly attributed to the roles of Germany and Austria-Hungary, and a rash disregard for peaceful multilateral solutions in response to an overall climate of imperialism that defined international relations at the time.

The rapidly increasing power of the military especially in Germany was certainly a factor that made war a much more apparent solution to diplomatic

World War II permanently reshaped world geography and politics for decades to come. It would end European militarism, pave the way for the invention of the atomic bomb, and the birth of the two postwar superpowers – the United States and the Soviet Union. In the same manner that geopolitical tensions caused by

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